I'd like to share a teaching that came to me one day as I sat before the Lord. I was just looking at the Blessed Sacrament and adoring Jesus and telling him I didn't have much to say except that I loved him. I felt as though the Lord said to me, "Well, don't you know that you don't have to say anything to me? Just be with me. Come into my presence. It's not what you do for me, it's what I want to do for you."  Then I got an image of a person going out of his house and sitting in the sun. As he sat in the sun, he didn't do a thing, but he started to change color.  People who saw him knew he had been in the sun because his skin showed it. The man knew it, too, because he felt the effects of the sun: the warmth and the light.  I heard the Lord saying, "So it is when you come into my presence. You will experience the effects of your time spent with me. People will see it in your actions."  It was a great teaching to me, knowing that I didn't always have to be saying things but all I had to do was be there with Jesus..........Miracles Do Happen Sister Briege McKenna, O.S.C.
Here is the essence of Eucharistic prayer. Here are the four ends of Eucharistic prayer. Under the guidance of St. Alphonsus all of our time spent before the Eucharist can fall into the four categories,

                    1. adoration
                    2. thanksgiving
                    3. reparation
                    4. petition.

Every time I receive the Eucharist at Mass, this is my thanksgiving–perhaps just a few minutes at the altar adoring the Eucharistic Presence, thanking God for all His graces, telling the Lord of my sorrow for the sins of a lifetime, and begging Him for the graces and favors I need. We can also do this in the Holy Hour with a prolonged period for each segment. I know of no better informal structure or heart-to-heart arrangement for a visit to the Eucharist. 

An Audience With Jesus
Msgr. John F. Davis
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Now Christ lives and acts in men by faith and by the sacraments of faith. The greatest of all the sacraments, the crown of the whole Christian life on earth, is the Sacrament of charity, the Blessed Eucharist, in which Christ not only gives us grace but actually gives us Himself. For in this most Holy Sacrament Jesus Christ Himself is truly and substantially present, and remains present as long as the consecrated species of bread and wine continue in existence. The Blessed Eucharist is therefore the very heart of Christianity since it contains Christ Himself, and since it is the chief means by which Christ mystically unites the faithful to Himself in one Body.

The Living Bread
Thomas Merton